Was Ibn Rushd an Averroist? The Problem, the Debate, and Its Philosophical Implications, 2013
By: Anna Akasoy
Title Was Ibn Rushd an Averroist? The Problem, the Debate, and Its Philosophical Implications
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2013
Published in Renaissance Averroism and Its Aftermath: Arabic Philosophy in Early Modern Europe
Pages 321–348
Categories Averroism
Author(s) Anna Akasoy
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

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Ibn Sabʿīn's Sicilian Questions. The Text, its Sources, and their Historical Context, 2008
By: Anna Ayşe Akasoy
Title Ibn Sabʿīn's Sicilian Questions. The Text, its Sources, and their Historical Context
Type Article
Language English
Date 2008
Journal Al-Qanṭara
Volume 29
Issue 1
Pages 115–146
Categories Tradition and Reception
Author(s) Anna Ayşe Akasoy
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
The Sicilian Questions are the earliest preserved text of the philosopher and Sufi Ibn Sabʿīn of Murcia (c. 614/1217–668/1270). Even though the prologue of the text claims that it is a response to questions sent by Frederick II to the Arab world, it seems more likely that it was an introductory manual for Arab students of philosophy, dealing with four specific and controversial problems as a way of presenting general concepts of Aristotelian philosophy. This article analyses the structure and way of argumentation in the Sicilian Questions. Particular attention is being paid to the relationship between mysticism and philosophy and the sources of the text, above all the philosophical writings of Ibn Rushd. Ibn Sabʿīn and his Sicilian Questions are interpreted as reflecting the intellectual milieu of late Almohad Spain. The text might have been originally composed in a ṭalaba context, and it also reflects some of the key concerns of Almohad ideology.

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Ibn Sabʿīn's Sicilian Questions. The Text, its Sources, and their Historical Context, 2008
By: Anna Ayşe Akasoy
Title Ibn Sabʿīn's Sicilian Questions. The Text, its Sources, and their Historical Context
Type Article
Language English
Date 2008
Journal Al-Qanṭara
Volume 29
Issue 1
Pages 115–146
Categories Tradition and Reception
Author(s) Anna Ayşe Akasoy
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
The Sicilian Questions are the earliest preserved text of the philosopher and Sufi Ibn Sabʿīn of Murcia (c. 614/1217–668/1270). Even though the prologue of the text claims that it is a response to questions sent by Frederick II to the Arab world, it seems more likely that it was an introductory manual for Arab students of philosophy, dealing with four specific and controversial problems as a way of presenting general concepts of Aristotelian philosophy. This article analyses the structure and way of argumentation in the Sicilian Questions. Particular attention is being paid to the relationship between mysticism and philosophy and the sources of the text, above all the philosophical writings of Ibn Rushd. Ibn Sabʿīn and his Sicilian Questions are interpreted as reflecting the intellectual milieu of late Almohad Spain. The text might have been originally composed in a ṭalaba context, and it also reflects some of the key concerns of Almohad ideology.

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Was Ibn Rushd an Averroist? The Problem, the Debate, and Its Philosophical Implications, 2013
By: Anna Akasoy
Title Was Ibn Rushd an Averroist? The Problem, the Debate, and Its Philosophical Implications
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2013
Published in Renaissance Averroism and Its Aftermath: Arabic Philosophy in Early Modern Europe
Pages 321–348
Categories Averroism
Author(s) Anna Akasoy
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

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