Averroes’ Critique of Ptolemy and Its Reception by John of Jandun and Agostino Nifo, 2015
By: Dag Nikolaus Hasse
Title Averroes’ Critique of Ptolemy and Its Reception by John of Jandun and Agostino Nifo
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2015
Published in Averroes’ Natural Philosophy and its Reception in the Latin West
Pages 69–88
Categories Natural Philosophy, Tradition and Reception, Latin Averroism
Author(s) Dag Nikolaus Hasse
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

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Arabic philosophy and Averroism, 2007
By: Dag Nikolaus Hasse
Title Arabic philosophy and Averroism
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2007
Published in The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy
Pages 113-136
Categories Averroism, Intellect, Metaphysics, Tradition and Reception
Author(s) Dag Nikolaus Hasse
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
The names of the famous Arabic philosophers Averroes and Avicenna, alongside those of Alkindi, Alfarabi, and Algazel, appear in countless philosophical writings of the Renaissance. These authors are well-known figures of the classical period of Arabic philosophy, which stretches from the ninth to the twelfth century AD. The history of Arabic philosophy began in the middle of the ninth century, when a substantial part of ancient Greek philosophy had become available in Arabic translations: almost the complete Aristotle, numerous Greek commentaries on Aristotle, and many Platonic and Neoplatonic sources. A major centre of intellectual activity was Baghdad, the new capital of the Abbasid caliphs. It was here that Alkindi (al-Kindī, d. after AD 870), the first important philosopher of Arabic culture, and the Aristotelian philosopher Alfarabi (al-Fārābī, d. 950/1) spent the greater part of their life. A major turning point in the history of Arabic philosophy was the activity of Avicenna (Ibn Sīnā, d. 1037), the court philosopher of various local rulers in Persia, who recast Aristotelian philosophy in a way that made it highly influential among Islamic theologians. The famous Baghdad theologian Algazel (al-Ghazālī, d. 1111) accepted much of Avicenna’s philosophy, but criticized it on central issues such as the eternity of the world. Averroes (Ibn Rushd, d. 1198), the Andalusian commentator on Aristotle, reacted to both Avicenna and Algazel: he censured Avicenna for deviating from Aristotle and criticized Algazel for misunderstanding the philosophical tradition.

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These authors are well-known figures of the classical period of Arabic philosophy, which stretches from the ninth to the twelfth century AD. The history of Arabic philosophy began in the middle of the ninth century, when a substantial part of ancient Greek philosophy had become available in Arabic translations: almost the complete Aristotle, numerous Greek commentaries on Aristotle, and many Platonic and Neoplatonic sources. A major centre of intellectual activity was Baghdad, the new capital of the Abbasid caliphs. It was here that Alkindi (al-Kind\u012b, d. after AD 870), the first important philosopher of Arabic culture, and the Aristotelian philosopher Alfarabi (al-F\u0101r\u0101b\u012b, d. 950\/1) spent the greater part of their life. A major turning point in the history of Arabic philosophy was the activity of Avicenna (Ibn S\u012bn\u0101, d. 1037), the court philosopher of various local rulers in Persia, who recast Aristotelian philosophy in a way that made it highly influential among Islamic theologians. The famous Baghdad theologian Algazel (al-Ghaz\u0101l\u012b, d. 1111) accepted much of Avicenna\u2019s philosophy, but criticized it on central issues such as the eternity of the world. Averroes (Ibn Rushd, d. 1198), the Andalusian commentator on Aristotle, reacted to both Avicenna and Algazel: he censured Avicenna for deviating from Aristotle and criticized Algazel for misunderstanding the philosophical tradition.","btype":2,"date":"2007","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.1017\/CCOL052184648X.007","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":1,"category_name":"Averroism","link":"bib?categories[]=Averroism"},{"id":75,"category_name":"Intellect","link":"bib?categories[]=Intellect"},{"id":31,"category_name":"Metaphysics","link":"bib?categories[]=Metaphysics"},{"id":43,"category_name":"Tradition and Reception","link":"bib?categories[]=Tradition and Reception"}],"authors":[{"id":1722,"full_name":"Dag Nikolaus Hasse","role":1}],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":{"id":5344,"section_of":5343,"pages":"113-136","is_catalog":null,"book":{"id":5343,"bilderberg_idno":null,"dare_idno":null,"catalog_idno":null,"entry_type":"bibliography","type":4,"language":"en","title":"The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","short_title":"","has_no_author":null,"volume":null,"date":"2007","edition_no":null,"free_date":null,"abstract":"The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy, published in 2007, provides an introduction to a complex period of change in the subject matter and practice of philosophy. The philosophy of the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries is often seen as transitional between the scholastic philosophy of the Middle Ages and modern philosophy, but the essays collected here, by a distinguished international team of contributors, call these assumptions into question, emphasizing both the continuity with scholastic philosophy and the role of Renaissance philosophy in the emergence of modernity. They explore the ways in which the science, religion and politics of the period reflect and are reflected in its philosophical life, and they emphasize the dynamism and pluralism of a period which saw both new perspectives and enduring contributions to the history of philosophy. 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Arabic philosophy and Averroism, 2007
By: Dag Nikolaus Hasse
Title Arabic philosophy and Averroism
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2007
Published in The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy
Pages 113-136
Categories Averroism, Intellect, Metaphysics, Tradition and Reception
Author(s) Dag Nikolaus Hasse
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
The names of the famous Arabic philosophers Averroes and Avicenna, alongside those of Alkindi, Alfarabi, and Algazel, appear in countless philosophical writings of the Renaissance. These authors are well-known figures of the classical period of Arabic philosophy, which stretches from the ninth to the twelfth century AD. The history of Arabic philosophy began in the middle of the ninth century, when a substantial part of ancient Greek philosophy had become available in Arabic translations: almost the complete Aristotle, numerous Greek commentaries on Aristotle, and many Platonic and Neoplatonic sources. A major centre of intellectual activity was Baghdad, the new capital of the Abbasid caliphs. It was here that Alkindi (al-Kindī, d. after AD 870), the first important philosopher of Arabic culture, and the Aristotelian philosopher Alfarabi (al-Fārābī, d. 950/1) spent the greater part of their life. A major turning point in the history of Arabic philosophy was the activity of Avicenna (Ibn Sīnā, d. 1037), the court philosopher of various local rulers in Persia, who recast Aristotelian philosophy in a way that made it highly influential among Islamic theologians. The famous Baghdad theologian Algazel (al-Ghazālī, d. 1111) accepted much of Avicenna’s philosophy, but criticized it on central issues such as the eternity of the world. Averroes (Ibn Rushd, d. 1198), the Andalusian commentator on Aristotle, reacted to both Avicenna and Algazel: he censured Avicenna for deviating from Aristotle and criticized Algazel for misunderstanding the philosophical tradition.

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These authors are well-known figures of the classical period of Arabic philosophy, which stretches from the ninth to the twelfth century AD. The history of Arabic philosophy began in the middle of the ninth century, when a substantial part of ancient Greek philosophy had become available in Arabic translations: almost the complete Aristotle, numerous Greek commentaries on Aristotle, and many Platonic and Neoplatonic sources. A major centre of intellectual activity was Baghdad, the new capital of the Abbasid caliphs. It was here that Alkindi (al-Kind\u012b, d. after AD 870), the first important philosopher of Arabic culture, and the Aristotelian philosopher Alfarabi (al-F\u0101r\u0101b\u012b, d. 950\/1) spent the greater part of their life. 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Averroes’ Critique of Ptolemy and Its Reception by John of Jandun and Agostino Nifo, 2015
By: Dag Nikolaus Hasse
Title Averroes’ Critique of Ptolemy and Its Reception by John of Jandun and Agostino Nifo
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2015
Published in Averroes’ Natural Philosophy and its Reception in the Latin West
Pages 69–88
Categories Natural Philosophy, Tradition and Reception, Latin Averroism
Author(s) Dag Nikolaus Hasse
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

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