The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy, 2016
By: Khaled El-Rouayheb (Ed.), Sabine Schmidtke (Ed.)
Title The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy
Type Edited Book
Language English
Date 2016
Publication Place New York, NY
Publisher Oxford University Press
Series Oxford handbooks
Categories Theology, Relation between Philosophy and Theology, Metaphysics, Law, Logic
Author(s) Khaled El-Rouayheb , Sabine Schmidtke
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
The study of Islamic philosophy has recently entered a new and exciting phase. Both the received canon of Islamic philosophers and the grand narrative of the course of Islamic philosophy are in the process of being radically questioned and revised. The bulk of twentieth-century Western scholarship on Arabic or Islamic philosophy focused on the period from the ninth century to the twelfth. It is a measure of the transformation that is currently underway in the field that the present Handbook gives roughly equal weight to every century from the ninth to the twentieth. The Handbook differs from previous overviews in another significant way: It is work-centered rather than person- or theme-centered. This format is intended to give readers a better sense of what a work in Islamic philosophy looks like, and of the issues, concepts, and arguments that are at play in works belonging to various periods and subfields within Islamic philosophy.

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"5212","_score":null,"_source":{"id":5212,"authors_free":[{"id":6012,"entry_id":5212,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":null,"person_id":null,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":2,"role_name":"editor"},"free_name":"Khaled El-Rouayheb","free_first_name":"Khaled","free_last_name":"El-Rouayheb ","norm_person":null},{"id":6013,"entry_id":5212,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":null,"person_id":null,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":2,"role_name":"editor"},"free_name":"Sabine Schmidtke","free_first_name":"Sabine","free_last_name":"Schmidtke","norm_person":null}],"entry_title":"The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy"},"abstract":"The study of Islamic philosophy has recently entered a new and exciting phase. Both the received canon of Islamic philosophers and the grand narrative of the course of Islamic philosophy are in the process of being radically questioned and revised. The bulk of twentieth-century Western scholarship on Arabic or Islamic philosophy focused on the period from the ninth century to the twelfth. It is a measure of the transformation that is currently underway in the field that the present Handbook gives roughly equal weight to every century from the ninth to the twentieth. The Handbook differs from previous overviews in another significant way: It is work-centered rather than person- or theme-centered. This format is intended to give readers a better sense of what a work in Islamic philosophy looks like, and of the issues, concepts, and arguments that are at play in works belonging to various periods and subfields within Islamic philosophy.","btype":4,"date":"2016","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"10.1093\/oxfordhb\/9780199917389.001.0001","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":39,"category_name":"Theology","link":"bib?categories[]=Theology"},{"id":47,"category_name":"Relation between Philosophy and Theology","link":"bib?categories[]=Relation between Philosophy and Theology"},{"id":31,"category_name":"Metaphysics","link":"bib?categories[]=Metaphysics"},{"id":26,"category_name":"Law","link":"bib?categories[]=Law"},{"id":27,"category_name":"Logic","link":"bib?categories[]=Logic"}],"authors":[],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":{"id":5212,"pubplace":"New York, NY","publisher":"Oxford University Press","series":"Oxford handbooks ","volume":"","edition_no":"","valid_from":null,"valid_until":null},"booksection":null,"article":null},"sort":[2016]}

The Convergence of Religious and Metaphysical Concepts: Mofet and Devequt in the Hebrew Translation of Averroës‘ Long Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics, 2001
By: Yehuda Halper
Title The Convergence of Religious and Metaphysical Concepts: Mofet and Devequt in the Hebrew Translation of Averroës‘ Long Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics
Type Article
Language English
Date 2001
Journal Studia Neoaristotelica
Volume 8
Issue 2
Pages 163-177
Categories Metaphysics, Aristotle, Relation between Philosophy and Theology
Author(s) Yehuda Halper
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
Translators of Aristotle’s and Averroës’ metaphysical works into 14th C Hebrew often associated important philosophical concepts with Hebrew terms that were also used to signify central Jewish and Biblical religious concepts. Here I examine how two such terms, “mofet” and “devequt”, were used to refer to extraordinary, divine wonders and to clinging (in particular to God) respectively in the religious texts, but to Aristotelian demonstration and continuity (especially noetic continuity) respectively in the translations of Averroës’ Long Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics. This kind of convergence of metaphysical and religious terms makes possible, indeed encourages, a re-interpretation of the religious concepts along Aristotelian lines. Biblical expressions of God’s wonders are thus to be interpreted to refer to Aristotelian demonstration and the mystical desire to cling to God is to refer to unifi cation with the Active Intellect.

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"1776","_score":null,"_source":{"id":1776,"authors_free":[{"id":2049,"entry_id":1776,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":1,"person_id":1500,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":1,"role_name":"author"},"free_name":"Yehuda Halper","free_first_name":"Yehuda","free_last_name":"Halper","norm_person":{"id":1500,"first_name":"Yehuda","last_name":"Halper","full_name":"Yehuda Halper","short_ident":"","is_classical_name":0,"dnb_url":"http:\/\/d-nb.info\/gnd\/142969923","viaf_url":"http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/177995327","db_url":"","from_claudius":1,"link":"bib?authors[]=Yehuda Halper"}}],"entry_title":"The Convergence of Religious and Metaphysical Concepts: Mofet and Devequt in the Hebrew Translation of Averro\u00ebs\u2018 Long Commentary on Aristotle\u2019s Metaphysics","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"The Convergence of Religious and Metaphysical Concepts: Mofet and Devequt in the Hebrew Translation of Averro\u00ebs\u2018 Long Commentary on Aristotle\u2019s Metaphysics"},"abstract":"Translators of Aristotle\u2019s and Averro\u00ebs\u2019 metaphysical works into 14th C Hebrew often associated important philosophical concepts with Hebrew terms that were also used to signify central Jewish and Biblical religious concepts. Here I examine how two such terms, \u201cmofet\u201d and \u201cdevequt\u201d, were used to refer to extraordinary, divine wonders and to clinging (in particular to God) respectively in the religious texts, but to Aristotelian demonstration and continuity (especially noetic continuity) respectively in the translations of Averro\u00ebs\u2019 Long Commentary on Aristotle\u2019s Metaphysics. This kind of convergence of metaphysical and religious terms makes possible, indeed encourages, a re-interpretation of the religious concepts along Aristotelian lines. Biblical expressions of God\u2019s wonders are thus to be interpreted to refer to Aristotelian demonstration and the mystical desire to cling to God is to refer to unifi cation with the Active Intellect.","btype":3,"date":"2001","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.5840\/studneoar20118213","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":31,"category_name":"Metaphysics","link":"bib?categories[]=Metaphysics"},{"id":21,"category_name":"Aristotle","link":"bib?categories[]=Aristotle"},{"id":47,"category_name":"Relation between Philosophy and Theology","link":"bib?categories[]=Relation between Philosophy and Theology"}],"authors":[{"id":1500,"full_name":"Yehuda Halper","role":1}],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":null,"article":{"id":1776,"journal_id":null,"journal_name":"Studia Neoaristotelica","volume":"8","issue":"2","pages":"163-177"}},"sort":[2001]}

The Convergence of Religious and Metaphysical Concepts: Mofet and Devequt in the Hebrew Translation of Averroës‘ Long Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics, 2001
By: Yehuda Halper
Title The Convergence of Religious and Metaphysical Concepts: Mofet and Devequt in the Hebrew Translation of Averroës‘ Long Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics
Type Article
Language English
Date 2001
Journal Studia Neoaristotelica
Volume 8
Issue 2
Pages 163-177
Categories Metaphysics, Aristotle, Relation between Philosophy and Theology
Author(s) Yehuda Halper
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
Translators of Aristotle’s and Averroës’ metaphysical works into 14th C Hebrew often associated important philosophical concepts with Hebrew terms that were also used to signify central Jewish and Biblical religious concepts. Here I examine how two such terms, “mofet” and “devequt”, were used to refer to extraordinary, divine wonders and to clinging (in particular to God) respectively in the religious texts, but to Aristotelian demonstration and continuity (especially noetic continuity) respectively in the translations of Averroës’ Long Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics. This kind of convergence of metaphysical and religious terms makes possible, indeed encourages, a re-interpretation of the religious concepts along Aristotelian lines. Biblical expressions of God’s wonders are thus to be interpreted to refer to Aristotelian demonstration and the mystical desire to cling to God is to refer to unifi cation with the Active Intellect.

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"1776","_score":null,"_source":{"id":1776,"authors_free":[{"id":2049,"entry_id":1776,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":1,"person_id":1500,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":1,"role_name":"author"},"free_name":"Yehuda Halper","free_first_name":"Yehuda","free_last_name":"Halper","norm_person":{"id":1500,"first_name":"Yehuda","last_name":"Halper","full_name":"Yehuda Halper","short_ident":"","is_classical_name":0,"dnb_url":"http:\/\/d-nb.info\/gnd\/142969923","viaf_url":"http:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/177995327","db_url":"","from_claudius":1,"link":"bib?authors[]=Yehuda Halper"}}],"entry_title":"The Convergence of Religious and Metaphysical Concepts: Mofet and Devequt in the Hebrew Translation of Averro\u00ebs\u2018 Long Commentary on Aristotle\u2019s Metaphysics","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"The Convergence of Religious and Metaphysical Concepts: Mofet and Devequt in the Hebrew Translation of Averro\u00ebs\u2018 Long Commentary on Aristotle\u2019s Metaphysics"},"abstract":"Translators of Aristotle\u2019s and Averro\u00ebs\u2019 metaphysical works into 14th C Hebrew often associated important philosophical concepts with Hebrew terms that were also used to signify central Jewish and Biblical religious concepts. Here I examine how two such terms, \u201cmofet\u201d and \u201cdevequt\u201d, were used to refer to extraordinary, divine wonders and to clinging (in particular to God) respectively in the religious texts, but to Aristotelian demonstration and continuity (especially noetic continuity) respectively in the translations of Averro\u00ebs\u2019 Long Commentary on Aristotle\u2019s Metaphysics. This kind of convergence of metaphysical and religious terms makes possible, indeed encourages, a re-interpretation of the religious concepts along Aristotelian lines. Biblical expressions of God\u2019s wonders are thus to be interpreted to refer to Aristotelian demonstration and the mystical desire to cling to God is to refer to unifi cation with the Active Intellect.","btype":3,"date":"2001","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.5840\/studneoar20118213","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":31,"category_name":"Metaphysics","link":"bib?categories[]=Metaphysics"},{"id":21,"category_name":"Aristotle","link":"bib?categories[]=Aristotle"},{"id":47,"category_name":"Relation between Philosophy and Theology","link":"bib?categories[]=Relation between Philosophy and Theology"}],"authors":[{"id":1500,"full_name":"Yehuda Halper","role":1}],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":null,"article":{"id":1776,"journal_id":null,"journal_name":"Studia Neoaristotelica","volume":"8","issue":"2","pages":"163-177"}},"sort":["The Convergence of Religious and Metaphysical Concepts: Mofet and Devequt in the Hebrew Translation of Averro\u00ebs\u2018 Long Commentary on Aristotle\u2019s Metaphysics"]}

The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy, 2016
By: Khaled El-Rouayheb (Ed.), Sabine Schmidtke (Ed.)
Title The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy
Type Edited Book
Language English
Date 2016
Publication Place New York, NY
Publisher Oxford University Press
Series Oxford handbooks
Categories Theology, Relation between Philosophy and Theology, Metaphysics, Law, Logic
Author(s) Khaled El-Rouayheb , Sabine Schmidtke
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
The study of Islamic philosophy has recently entered a new and exciting phase. Both the received canon of Islamic philosophers and the grand narrative of the course of Islamic philosophy are in the process of being radically questioned and revised. The bulk of twentieth-century Western scholarship on Arabic or Islamic philosophy focused on the period from the ninth century to the twelfth. It is a measure of the transformation that is currently underway in the field that the present Handbook gives roughly equal weight to every century from the ninth to the twentieth. The Handbook differs from previous overviews in another significant way: It is work-centered rather than person- or theme-centered. This format is intended to give readers a better sense of what a work in Islamic philosophy looks like, and of the issues, concepts, and arguments that are at play in works belonging to various periods and subfields within Islamic philosophy.

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"5212","_score":null,"_source":{"id":5212,"authors_free":[{"id":6012,"entry_id":5212,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":null,"person_id":null,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":2,"role_name":"editor"},"free_name":"Khaled El-Rouayheb","free_first_name":"Khaled","free_last_name":"El-Rouayheb ","norm_person":null},{"id":6013,"entry_id":5212,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":null,"person_id":null,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":2,"role_name":"editor"},"free_name":"Sabine Schmidtke","free_first_name":"Sabine","free_last_name":"Schmidtke","norm_person":null}],"entry_title":"The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy"},"abstract":"The study of Islamic philosophy has recently entered a new and exciting phase. Both the received canon of Islamic philosophers and the grand narrative of the course of Islamic philosophy are in the process of being radically questioned and revised. The bulk of twentieth-century Western scholarship on Arabic or Islamic philosophy focused on the period from the ninth century to the twelfth. It is a measure of the transformation that is currently underway in the field that the present Handbook gives roughly equal weight to every century from the ninth to the twentieth. The Handbook differs from previous overviews in another significant way: It is work-centered rather than person- or theme-centered. This format is intended to give readers a better sense of what a work in Islamic philosophy looks like, and of the issues, concepts, and arguments that are at play in works belonging to various periods and subfields within Islamic philosophy.","btype":4,"date":"2016","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"10.1093\/oxfordhb\/9780199917389.001.0001","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":39,"category_name":"Theology","link":"bib?categories[]=Theology"},{"id":47,"category_name":"Relation between Philosophy and Theology","link":"bib?categories[]=Relation between Philosophy and Theology"},{"id":31,"category_name":"Metaphysics","link":"bib?categories[]=Metaphysics"},{"id":26,"category_name":"Law","link":"bib?categories[]=Law"},{"id":27,"category_name":"Logic","link":"bib?categories[]=Logic"}],"authors":[],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":{"id":5212,"pubplace":"New York, NY","publisher":"Oxford University Press","series":"Oxford handbooks ","volume":"","edition_no":"","valid_from":null,"valid_until":null},"booksection":null,"article":null},"sort":["The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy"]}

  • PAGE 1 OF 1