Imposing Alfarabi on Plato: Averroes’s Novel Placement of the Platonic City, 2022
By: Alexander Orwin
Title Imposing Alfarabi on Plato: Averroes’s Novel Placement of the Platonic City
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2022
Published in Plato's Republic in the Islamic Context. New Perspectives on Averroes's Commentary
Pages 19–39
Categories al-Fārābī, Galen, Aristotle, Plato, Politics, Commentary
Author(s) Alexander Orwin
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
Averroes's Commentary on Plato's “Republic” goes far beyond merely commenting on the original. With the benefit of 1,500 years of hindsight, it reckons with important works of philosophy that would have been completely unknown to Plato. Averroes mentions three authors of such works by name: Galen, whom he mostly rebukes, Aristotle, and Alfarabi. It would be hasty to assert that by including such extraneous material, Averroes departs from Plato, but, at the very least, he updates him on account of historical developments. The importance of Averroes's post-Platonic additions is evident from the very structure of the work. The part of it that can plausibly claim to be a commentary on Plato does not begin until 27.24, almost seven pages into Rosenthal's Hebrew text. Averroes begins to address the subject of war, corresponding to Republic 374b, having skipped all of book 1 and the majority of book 2, with only two brief references to them in the opening section (CR 22.27–30, 23.31–33, cf. 47.29–30and 105.25–27). Averroes does not justify his omission until the very end of the work, when he states that the opening part of the Republic does not contain any of the demonstrative arguments of which his commentary is comprised (CR 105.25–27, cf. 21.4). He is more immediately forthright about the reasons for what he includes in its place. In keeping with the demonstrative focus of the work, Averroes replaces Platonic dialectic with a substantial discussion of science. Having divided practical science into two parts, one about general habits and actions and another about their implementation, Averroes explains: “Before we begin a point-by-point explanation of what is in these arguments [of Plato], we ought to mention the things pertinent to this [second] part [of practical science] and explained in the first part, that serve as foundation for what we wish to say here at the beginning” (CR 22.6–8). Averroes's introduction concerns above all the first part of political science, while the Republic proper contains only the second. Averroes attributes to Plato only a small part of the ensuing discussion, concerning justice, the division of labor, and the arrangement of the soul (CR 22.22–24.6, esp. 22.27, 23.31). The other passages are inspired by Aristotle and especially Alfarabi. Averroes appears to substitute scientific arguments from Aristotle and Alfarabi—mainly about science, philosophy, courage, and war—for Plato's dialectical introduction about justice and the founding of the just city.

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"5347","_score":null,"_source":{"id":5347,"authors_free":[{"id":6197,"entry_id":5347,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":1,"person_id":1790,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":1,"role_name":"author"},"free_name":"Alexander Orwin","free_first_name":"Alexander","free_last_name":"Orwin","norm_person":{"id":1790,"first_name":" Alexander","last_name":" Orwin","full_name":" Alexander Orwin","short_ident":"","is_classical_name":null,"dnb_url":"https:\/\/d-nb.info\/1153328348","viaf_url":"","db_url":"","from_claudius":null,"link":"bib?authors[]= Alexander Orwin"}}],"entry_title":"Imposing Alfarabi on Plato: Averroes\u2019s Novel Placement of the Platonic City","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"Imposing Alfarabi on Plato: Averroes\u2019s Novel Placement of the Platonic City"},"abstract":"Averroes's Commentary on Plato's \u201cRepublic\u201d goes far beyond merely commenting on the original. With the benefit of 1,500 years of hindsight, it reckons with important works of philosophy that would have been completely unknown to Plato. Averroes mentions three authors of such works by name: Galen, whom he mostly rebukes, Aristotle, and Alfarabi. It would be hasty to assert that by including such extraneous material, Averroes departs from Plato, but, at the very least, he updates him on account of historical developments.\r\n\r\nThe importance of Averroes's post-Platonic additions is evident from the very structure of the work. The part of it that can plausibly claim to be a commentary on Plato does not begin until 27.24, almost seven pages into Rosenthal's Hebrew text. Averroes begins to address the subject of war, corresponding to Republic 374b, having skipped all of book 1 and the majority of book 2, with only two brief references to them in the opening section (CR 22.27\u201330, 23.31\u201333, cf. 47.29\u201330and 105.25\u201327). Averroes does not justify his omission until the very end of the work, when he states that the opening part of the Republic does not contain any of the demonstrative arguments of which his commentary is comprised (CR 105.25\u201327, cf. 21.4). He is more immediately forthright about the reasons for what he includes in its place. In keeping with the demonstrative focus of the work, Averroes replaces Platonic dialectic with a substantial discussion of science. Having divided practical science into two parts, one about general habits and actions and another about their implementation, Averroes explains: \u201cBefore we begin a point-by-point explanation of what is in these arguments [of Plato], we ought to mention the things pertinent to this [second] part [of practical science] and explained in the first part, that serve as foundation for what we wish to say here at the beginning\u201d (CR 22.6\u20138). Averroes's introduction concerns above all the first part of political science, while the Republic proper contains only the second. Averroes attributes to Plato only a small part of the ensuing discussion, concerning justice, the division of labor, and the arrangement of the soul (CR 22.22\u201324.6, esp. 22.27, 23.31). The other passages are inspired by Aristotle and especially Alfarabi. Averroes appears to substitute scientific arguments from Aristotle and Alfarabi\u2014mainly about science, philosophy, courage, and war\u2014for Plato's dialectical introduction about justice and the founding of the just city.","btype":2,"date":"2022","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.1017\/9781800104983.002","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":28,"category_name":"al-F\u0101r\u0101b\u012b","link":"bib?categories[]=al-F\u0101r\u0101b\u012b"},{"id":30,"category_name":"Galen","link":"bib?categories[]=Galen"},{"id":21,"category_name":"Aristotle","link":"bib?categories[]=Aristotle"},{"id":20,"category_name":"Plato","link":"bib?categories[]=Plato"},{"id":4,"category_name":"Politics","link":"bib?categories[]=Politics"},{"id":23,"category_name":"Commentary","link":"bib?categories[]=Commentary"}],"authors":[{"id":1790,"full_name":" Alexander Orwin","role":1}],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":{"id":5347,"section_of":5346,"pages":"19\u201339","is_catalog":null,"book":{"id":5346,"bilderberg_idno":null,"dare_idno":null,"catalog_idno":null,"entry_type":"bibliography","type":4,"language":"en","title":"Plato's Republic in the Islamic Context. New Perspectives on Averroes's Commentary","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","short_title":"","has_no_author":null,"volume":null,"date":"2022","edition_no":null,"free_date":null,"abstract":"","republication_of":0,"online_url":"","online_resources":null,"translation_of":"0","new_edition_of":"0","is_catalog":0,"in_bibliography":0,"is_inactive":0,"notes":null,"ti_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.1017\/9781800104983","book":{"id":5346,"pubplace":"","publisher":" Boydell & Brewer","series":"","volume":"","edition_no":"","valid_from":null,"valid_until":null},"persons":[{"id":6196,"entry_id":5346,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":null,"person_id":null,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":2,"role_name":"editor"},"free_name":" Alexander Orwin","free_first_name":" Alexander","free_last_name":" Orwin","norm_person":null}]}},"article":null},"sort":[2022]}

Music, Poetry, and Politics in Averroes’s Commentary on Plato’s “Republic”, 2022
By: Douglas Kries
Title Music, Poetry, and Politics in Averroes’s Commentary on Plato’s “Republic”
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2022
Published in Plato's Republic in the Islamic Context. New Perspectives on Averroes's Commentary
Pages 87–110
Categories Poetics, Politics, Plato
Author(s) Douglas Kries
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
As our title announces, the current essay will explore three subjects that, in Averroes's Commentary on Plato's “Republic,” lead from one into another, almost like a short series of stepping-stones. The first part of the essay will consider the treatment of music in the Commentary, arguing that Averroes effectively reduces music to poetry. The second of the stepping-stones will show that the Commentary credits poetry with educating the young especially and in that way transforms poetry into a political art for disciplining and educating citizens. The third will take up the question of the Andalusian's extended criticism of poetry's common practice of offering pleasurable prizes and rewards for virtue and show how the Commentator applies this criticism of poetry to the very author on whom he is commenting. In pursuing all three of these questions, we will focus squarely on Averroes's Commentary on Plato's “Republic,” attempting to understand that text on its own terms but against its obvious background, the Republic of Plato. Nevertheless, in pursuing the teaching of The Commentary on Plato's “Republic,” we cannot neglect the important research that has been done in recent decades on classical Islamic philosophy's understanding of Aristotle's Organon generally and of the Poetics in particular. We will therefore turn to the reports of other scholars on these aspects of Averroes, at least to the extent that such reports will be helpful in enabling us to understand better the Commentary on Plato's “Republic.” In the Republic, Plato initiates his analysis of the education of the guardians with a discussion of music in the latter portions of book 2; that discussion extends through much of book 3. Averroes's corresponding treatment of the education of the guardians through music is in the “First Treatise” of the Commentary, mostly in a relatively lengthy and isolable section that extends from 29.9 through 36.5. During his treatment of music, Plato divides his subject into three parts: “melody is composed of three things—speech, harmonic mode, and rhythm.” Averroes seems to accept this division, although he inverts the order of the three elements: “A melody occurring in a narrative is composed of three things: rhythm, harmonic mode, and the speech to which the melody is set” (34.30–31).

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"5350","_score":null,"_source":{"id":5350,"authors_free":[{"id":6200,"entry_id":5350,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":null,"person_id":null,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":1,"role_name":"author"},"free_name":"Douglas Kries","free_first_name":"Douglas","free_last_name":"Kries","norm_person":null}],"entry_title":"Music, Poetry, and Politics in Averroes\u2019s Commentary on Plato\u2019s \u201cRepublic\u201d","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"Music, Poetry, and Politics in Averroes\u2019s Commentary on Plato\u2019s \u201cRepublic\u201d"},"abstract":"As our title announces, the current essay will explore three subjects that, in Averroes's Commentary on Plato's \u201cRepublic,\u201d lead from one into another, almost like a short series of stepping-stones. The first part of the essay will consider the treatment of music in the Commentary, arguing that Averroes effectively reduces music to poetry. The second of the stepping-stones will show that the Commentary credits poetry with educating the young especially and in that way transforms poetry into a political art for disciplining and educating citizens. The third will take up the question of the Andalusian's extended criticism of poetry's common practice of offering pleasurable prizes and rewards for virtue and show how the Commentator applies this criticism of poetry to the very author on whom he is commenting. In pursuing all three of these questions, we will focus squarely on Averroes's Commentary on Plato's \u201cRepublic,\u201d attempting to understand that text on its own terms but against its obvious background, the Republic of Plato. Nevertheless, in pursuing the teaching of The Commentary on Plato's \u201cRepublic,\u201d we cannot neglect the important research that has been done in recent decades on classical Islamic philosophy's understanding of Aristotle's Organon generally and of the Poetics in particular. We will therefore turn to the reports of other scholars on these aspects of Averroes, at least to the extent that such reports will be helpful in enabling us to understand better the Commentary on Plato's \u201cRepublic.\u201d\r\n\r\nIn the Republic, Plato initiates his analysis of the education of the guardians with a discussion of music in the latter portions of book 2; that discussion extends through much of book 3. Averroes's corresponding treatment of the education of the guardians through music is in the \u201cFirst Treatise\u201d of the Commentary, mostly in a relatively lengthy and isolable section that extends from 29.9 through 36.5. During his treatment of music, Plato divides his subject into three parts: \u201cmelody is composed of three things\u2014speech, harmonic mode, and rhythm.\u201d Averroes seems to accept this division, although he inverts the order of the three elements: \u201cA melody occurring in a narrative is composed of three things: rhythm, harmonic mode, and the speech to which the melody is set\u201d (34.30\u201331).","btype":2,"date":"2022","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.1017\/9781800104983.005","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":44,"category_name":"Poetics","link":"bib?categories[]=Poetics"},{"id":4,"category_name":"Politics","link":"bib?categories[]=Politics"},{"id":20,"category_name":"Plato","link":"bib?categories[]=Plato"}],"authors":[],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":{"id":5350,"section_of":5346,"pages":"87\u2013110","is_catalog":null,"book":{"id":5346,"bilderberg_idno":null,"dare_idno":null,"catalog_idno":null,"entry_type":"bibliography","type":4,"language":"en","title":"Plato's Republic in the Islamic Context. New Perspectives on Averroes's Commentary","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","short_title":"","has_no_author":null,"volume":null,"date":"2022","edition_no":null,"free_date":null,"abstract":"","republication_of":0,"online_url":"","online_resources":null,"translation_of":"0","new_edition_of":"0","is_catalog":0,"in_bibliography":0,"is_inactive":0,"notes":null,"ti_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.1017\/9781800104983","book":{"id":5346,"pubplace":"","publisher":" Boydell & Brewer","series":"","volume":"","edition_no":"","valid_from":null,"valid_until":null},"persons":[{"id":6196,"entry_id":5346,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":null,"person_id":null,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":2,"role_name":"editor"},"free_name":" Alexander Orwin","free_first_name":" Alexander","free_last_name":" Orwin","norm_person":null}]}},"article":null},"sort":[2022]}

Ficino und Averroes. Ein vorläufiger Kommentar zu Ficinos Auseinandersetzung mit Averroes im Buch XV der Theologia Platonica, 2021
By: Thomas Leinkauf
Title Ficino und Averroes. Ein vorläufiger Kommentar zu Ficinos Auseinandersetzung mit Averroes im Buch XV der Theologia Platonica
Type Book Section
Language German
Date 2021
Published in Averroism between the 15th and 17th Century
Pages 9–79
Categories Renaissance, Tradition and Reception, Plato
Author(s) Thomas Leinkauf
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"5002","_score":null,"_ignored":["booksection.book.abstract.keyword"],"_source":{"id":5002,"authors_free":[{"id":5737,"entry_id":5002,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":1,"person_id":1671,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":1,"role_name":"author"},"free_name":"Thomas Leinkauf","free_first_name":"Thomas","free_last_name":"Leinkauf","norm_person":{"id":1671,"first_name":"Thomas","last_name":"Leinkauf","full_name":"Thomas Leinkauf","short_ident":"","is_classical_name":null,"dnb_url":" https:\/\/d-nb.info\/gnd\/122040309","viaf_url":"","db_url":"","from_claudius":null,"link":"bib?authors[]=Thomas Leinkauf"}}],"entry_title":"Ficino und Averroes. Ein vorl\u00e4ufiger Kommentar zu Ficinos Auseinandersetzung mit Averroes im Buch XV der Theologia Platonica","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"Ficino und Averroes. Ein vorl\u00e4ufiger Kommentar zu Ficinos Auseinandersetzung mit Averroes im Buch XV der Theologia Platonica"},"abstract":"","btype":2,"date":"2021","language":"German","online_url":"","doi_url":"","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":5,"category_name":"Renaissance","link":"bib?categories[]=Renaissance"},{"id":43,"category_name":"Tradition and Reception","link":"bib?categories[]=Tradition and Reception"},{"id":20,"category_name":"Plato","link":"bib?categories[]=Plato"}],"authors":[{"id":1671,"full_name":"Thomas Leinkauf","role":1}],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":{"id":5002,"section_of":4998,"pages":"9\u201379","is_catalog":null,"book":{"id":4998,"bilderberg_idno":null,"dare_idno":null,"catalog_idno":null,"entry_type":"bibliography","type":4,"language":"no language selected","title":"Averroism between the 15th and 17th Century","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","short_title":"","has_no_author":null,"volume":null,"date":"2021","edition_no":null,"free_date":null,"abstract":"The collection of papers assesses the impact of the reception of Averroist ideas on philosophy between the 15th and 17th century in the Latin West. Most of the articles in the volume were presented at the conference \"Averroism between the 15th and 17th century,\" which was held on 9th -10th November, 2016 by the Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts at Palack\u00fd University, Olomouc, the Czech Republic. The contributors explore the influence of Averroes, identify the difficulties in the interpretation of his works, and study his followers and critics in the Latin, Hebrew, and Byzantine traditions.","republication_of":0,"online_url":"","online_resources":null,"translation_of":"0","new_edition_of":"0","is_catalog":0,"in_bibliography":0,"is_inactive":0,"notes":null,"ti_url":"","doi_url":"","book":{"id":4998,"pubplace":"Nordhausen","publisher":"Verlag Traugott Bautz","series":"Studia Classica et Mediaevalia","volume":"28","edition_no":"","valid_from":null,"valid_until":null}}},"article":null},"sort":[2021]}

Echoes of Averroes in Renaissance Platonism: Cardinal Bessarion, 2021
By: Jozef Matula
Title Echoes of Averroes in Renaissance Platonism: Cardinal Bessarion
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2021
Published in Averroism between the 15th and 17th Century
Pages 116–150
Categories Plato, Renaissance, Tradition and Reception
Author(s) Jozef Matula
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

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Legitimate and Illegitimate Violence in Arabic Political Philosophy: al-Fârâbî, Ibn Rushd and Ibn Khaldûn, 2018
By: Miklós Maróth
Title Legitimate and Illegitimate Violence in Arabic Political Philosophy: al-Fârâbî, Ibn Rushd and Ibn Khaldûn
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2018
Published in Violence in Islamic Thought from the Mongols to European Imperialism
Pages 149–164
Categories al-Fārābī, Plato, Politics
Author(s) Miklós Maróth
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"5097","_score":null,"_ignored":["booksection.book.abstract.keyword"],"_source":{"id":5097,"authors_free":[{"id":5871,"entry_id":5097,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":1,"person_id":1080,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":1,"role_name":"author"},"free_name":"Mikl\u00f3s Mar\u00f3th","free_first_name":"Mikl\u00f3s","free_last_name":"Mar\u00f3th","norm_person":{"id":1080,"first_name":"Mikl\u00f3s","last_name":"Mar\u00f3th","full_name":"Mikl\u00f3s Mar\u00f3th","short_ident":"","is_classical_name":0,"dnb_url":"http:\/\/d-nb.info\/gnd\/136094120","viaf_url":"https:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/111274403","db_url":"","from_claudius":1,"link":"bib?authors[]=Mikl\u00f3s Mar\u00f3th"}}],"entry_title":"Legitimate and Illegitimate Violence in Arabic Political Philosophy: al-F\u00e2r\u00e2b\u00ee, Ibn Rushd and Ibn Khald\u00fbn","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"Legitimate and Illegitimate Violence in Arabic Political Philosophy: al-F\u00e2r\u00e2b\u00ee, Ibn Rushd and Ibn Khald\u00fbn"},"abstract":"","btype":2,"date":"2018","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":28,"category_name":"al-F\u0101r\u0101b\u012b","link":"bib?categories[]=al-F\u0101r\u0101b\u012b"},{"id":20,"category_name":"Plato","link":"bib?categories[]=Plato"},{"id":4,"category_name":"Politics","link":"bib?categories[]=Politics"}],"authors":[{"id":1080,"full_name":"Mikl\u00f3s Mar\u00f3th","role":1}],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":{"id":5097,"section_of":5096,"pages":"149\u2013164","is_catalog":null,"book":{"id":5096,"bilderberg_idno":null,"dare_idno":null,"catalog_idno":null,"entry_type":"bibliography","type":4,"language":"en","title":"Violence in Islamic Thought from the Mongols to European Imperialism","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","short_title":"","has_no_author":null,"volume":null,"date":"2018","edition_no":null,"free_date":null,"abstract":"Examines the development of Muslim theological, legal, literary and cultural discussions about violence and its legitimation\r\n\r\nThe violent conquest of the eastern part of the lands under Muslim rule by the Mongols marked a new period in the history of Islamic civilisation and in attitudes towards violence. This volume examines the various intellectual and cultural reactions of Muslim thinkers to these events, both within and without the territories subjected to Mongol control. Each chapter examines how violent acts were assessed by Muslim intellectuals, analysing both changes and continuity within Islamic thought over time.\r\n\r\nEach chapter is structured around a case study in which violent acts are justified or condemned, revealing the variety of attitudes to violence in the medieval period. They are framed by a detailed introduction, focusing on theoretical perspectives on violence and religion and their application, or otherwise, to medieval Islam.","republication_of":0,"online_url":"","online_resources":null,"translation_of":"0","new_edition_of":"0","is_catalog":0,"in_bibliography":0,"is_inactive":0,"notes":null,"ti_url":"","doi_url":"","book":{"id":5096,"pubplace":"Edinburgh","publisher":"Edinburgh University Press","series":"","volume":"","edition_no":"","valid_from":null,"valid_until":null}}},"article":null},"sort":[2018]}

Averroes’ Commentary on Plato’s Republic, 2015
By: Muhsin Mahdi
Title Averroes’ Commentary on Plato’s Republic
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2015
Published in Political Philosophy and Philosophy of History: Proceedings of the Colloquium dedicated to Muhsin Mahdi
Pages 27–42
Categories Commentary, Plato, Politics
Author(s) Muhsin Mahdi
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"5251","_score":null,"_source":{"id":5251,"authors_free":[{"id":6060,"entry_id":5251,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":1,"person_id":870,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":1,"role_name":"author"},"free_name":"Muhsin Mahdi","free_first_name":"Muhsin","free_last_name":"Mahdi","norm_person":{"id":870,"first_name":"Muhsin","last_name":"Mahdi","full_name":"Muhsin Mahdi","short_ident":"","is_classical_name":0,"dnb_url":"http:\/\/d-nb.info\/gnd\/102669728X","viaf_url":"https:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/17304596","db_url":"","from_claudius":1,"link":"bib?authors[]=Muhsin Mahdi"}}],"entry_title":"Averroes\u2019 Commentary on Plato\u2019s Republic","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"Averroes\u2019 Commentary on Plato\u2019s Republic"},"abstract":"","btype":2,"date":"2015","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":23,"category_name":"Commentary","link":"bib?categories[]=Commentary"},{"id":20,"category_name":"Plato","link":"bib?categories[]=Plato"},{"id":4,"category_name":"Politics","link":"bib?categories[]=Politics"}],"authors":[{"id":870,"full_name":"Muhsin Mahdi","role":1}],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":{"id":5251,"section_of":5250,"pages":"27\u201342","is_catalog":null,"book":{"id":5250,"bilderberg_idno":null,"dare_idno":null,"catalog_idno":null,"entry_type":"bibliography","type":4,"language":"no language selected","title":"Political Philosophy and Philosophy of History: Proceedings of the Colloquium dedicated to Muhsin Mahdi","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","short_title":"","has_no_author":null,"volume":null,"date":"2015","edition_no":null,"free_date":null,"abstract":"","republication_of":0,"online_url":"","online_resources":null,"translation_of":"0","new_edition_of":"0","is_catalog":0,"in_bibliography":0,"is_inactive":0,"notes":null,"ti_url":"","doi_url":"","book":{"id":5250,"pubplace":"Tunis","publisher":"D\u00e2r al-tanw\u00eer","series":"","volume":"","edition_no":"","valid_from":null,"valid_until":null}}},"article":null},"sort":[2015]}

The Cambridge Platonists and Averroes, 2013
By: Sarah Hutton
Title The Cambridge Platonists and Averroes
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2013
Published in Renaissance Averroism and Its Aftermath: Arabic Philosophy in Early Modern Europe
Pages 197–212
Categories Plato, Averroism, Tradition and Reception
Author(s) Sarah Hutton
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
The ‘Averroism’ which figures in my chapter is a radically attenuated version of the philosophy of Ibn Rushd – Averroism as represented by a single doctrine imputed to the Commentator, namely the idea of a single soul, common to all human beings. The subject of my chapter has less, therefore to do with the thought of Averroes in its later reception or manifestation, and more to do with an idea of Averroism which was current in seventeenth-century England. This is particularly true of the Cambridge Platonists for whom the Averroist doctrine of the intellectus agens is the key doctrine which they associate with Averroes and which they understood as a doctrine of a ‘single soul’ or ‘common soul’. The only one of their number to offer anything like an extensive critique of Averroes was Henry More (1614–1687). Although he too was primarily concerned with the Averroistic conception of the intellectus agens, his response is distinctive for his concern with the Italian Averroists of recent times, Girolamo Cardano, Pietro Pomponazzi and Giulio Cesare Vanini. Even though the Cambridge Platonists’ views on the intellectus agens tell us more about themselves than about Averroes, their limited focus is nevertheless revealing of currents of diffusion of Averroistic ideas, and of the presence of Averroes even in the new waters of early modern philosophy. As I shall argue later, there is an important sense in which More’s partial and distorted conception of the philosophy of Ibn Rushd contributed to a new conception of the self centred on consciousness. My chapter will offer a brief survey of identifiable references to Averroes in the work the Cambridge Platonists, starting with three Emmanuel College men, John Smith (1618–1652), Nathaniel Culverwell (1619–1651) and Ralph Cudworth (1617–1688). I shall then discuss Henry More, to whom the major part of this chapter will be devoted. But before discussing the Cambridge school, a few words on the background.

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The ruler’s essential qualities in Averroes’ Commentary on Plato’s „Republic“, 2013
By: Rosalie Helena de Souza Pereira
Title The ruler’s essential qualities in Averroes’ Commentary on Plato’s „Republic“
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2013
Published in Dialogues on Plato's Politeia (Republic): selected papers from the Ninth Symposium Platonicum
Pages 371–376
Categories Politics, Plato, Commentary
Author(s) Rosalie Helena de Souza Pereira
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

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Averroes’ Commentary on Plato’s Republic, 2015
By: Muhsin Mahdi
Title Averroes’ Commentary on Plato’s Republic
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2015
Published in Political Philosophy and Philosophy of History: Proceedings of the Colloquium dedicated to Muhsin Mahdi
Pages 27–42
Categories Commentary, Plato, Politics
Author(s) Muhsin Mahdi
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

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Echoes of Averroes in Renaissance Platonism: Cardinal Bessarion, 2021
By: Jozef Matula
Title Echoes of Averroes in Renaissance Platonism: Cardinal Bessarion
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2021
Published in Averroism between the 15th and 17th Century
Pages 116–150
Categories Plato, Renaissance, Tradition and Reception
Author(s) Jozef Matula
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

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Ficino und Averroes. Ein vorläufiger Kommentar zu Ficinos Auseinandersetzung mit Averroes im Buch XV der Theologia Platonica, 2021
By: Thomas Leinkauf
Title Ficino und Averroes. Ein vorläufiger Kommentar zu Ficinos Auseinandersetzung mit Averroes im Buch XV der Theologia Platonica
Type Book Section
Language German
Date 2021
Published in Averroism between the 15th and 17th Century
Pages 9–79
Categories Renaissance, Tradition and Reception, Plato
Author(s) Thomas Leinkauf
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

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Imposing Alfarabi on Plato: Averroes’s Novel Placement of the Platonic City, 2022
By: Alexander Orwin
Title Imposing Alfarabi on Plato: Averroes’s Novel Placement of the Platonic City
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2022
Published in Plato's Republic in the Islamic Context. New Perspectives on Averroes's Commentary
Pages 19–39
Categories al-Fārābī, Galen, Aristotle, Plato, Politics, Commentary
Author(s) Alexander Orwin
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
Averroes's Commentary on Plato's “Republic” goes far beyond merely commenting on the original. With the benefit of 1,500 years of hindsight, it reckons with important works of philosophy that would have been completely unknown to Plato. Averroes mentions three authors of such works by name: Galen, whom he mostly rebukes, Aristotle, and Alfarabi. It would be hasty to assert that by including such extraneous material, Averroes departs from Plato, but, at the very least, he updates him on account of historical developments. The importance of Averroes's post-Platonic additions is evident from the very structure of the work. The part of it that can plausibly claim to be a commentary on Plato does not begin until 27.24, almost seven pages into Rosenthal's Hebrew text. Averroes begins to address the subject of war, corresponding to Republic 374b, having skipped all of book 1 and the majority of book 2, with only two brief references to them in the opening section (CR 22.27–30, 23.31–33, cf. 47.29–30and 105.25–27). Averroes does not justify his omission until the very end of the work, when he states that the opening part of the Republic does not contain any of the demonstrative arguments of which his commentary is comprised (CR 105.25–27, cf. 21.4). He is more immediately forthright about the reasons for what he includes in its place. In keeping with the demonstrative focus of the work, Averroes replaces Platonic dialectic with a substantial discussion of science. Having divided practical science into two parts, one about general habits and actions and another about their implementation, Averroes explains: “Before we begin a point-by-point explanation of what is in these arguments [of Plato], we ought to mention the things pertinent to this [second] part [of practical science] and explained in the first part, that serve as foundation for what we wish to say here at the beginning” (CR 22.6–8). Averroes's introduction concerns above all the first part of political science, while the Republic proper contains only the second. Averroes attributes to Plato only a small part of the ensuing discussion, concerning justice, the division of labor, and the arrangement of the soul (CR 22.22–24.6, esp. 22.27, 23.31). The other passages are inspired by Aristotle and especially Alfarabi. Averroes appears to substitute scientific arguments from Aristotle and Alfarabi—mainly about science, philosophy, courage, and war—for Plato's dialectical introduction about justice and the founding of the just city.

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"5347","_score":null,"_source":{"id":5347,"authors_free":[{"id":6197,"entry_id":5347,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":1,"person_id":1790,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":1,"role_name":"author"},"free_name":"Alexander Orwin","free_first_name":"Alexander","free_last_name":"Orwin","norm_person":{"id":1790,"first_name":" Alexander","last_name":" Orwin","full_name":" Alexander Orwin","short_ident":"","is_classical_name":null,"dnb_url":"https:\/\/d-nb.info\/1153328348","viaf_url":"","db_url":"","from_claudius":null,"link":"bib?authors[]= Alexander Orwin"}}],"entry_title":"Imposing Alfarabi on Plato: Averroes\u2019s Novel Placement of the Platonic City","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"Imposing Alfarabi on Plato: Averroes\u2019s Novel Placement of the Platonic City"},"abstract":"Averroes's Commentary on Plato's \u201cRepublic\u201d goes far beyond merely commenting on the original. With the benefit of 1,500 years of hindsight, it reckons with important works of philosophy that would have been completely unknown to Plato. Averroes mentions three authors of such works by name: Galen, whom he mostly rebukes, Aristotle, and Alfarabi. It would be hasty to assert that by including such extraneous material, Averroes departs from Plato, but, at the very least, he updates him on account of historical developments.\r\n\r\nThe importance of Averroes's post-Platonic additions is evident from the very structure of the work. The part of it that can plausibly claim to be a commentary on Plato does not begin until 27.24, almost seven pages into Rosenthal's Hebrew text. Averroes begins to address the subject of war, corresponding to Republic 374b, having skipped all of book 1 and the majority of book 2, with only two brief references to them in the opening section (CR 22.27\u201330, 23.31\u201333, cf. 47.29\u201330and 105.25\u201327). Averroes does not justify his omission until the very end of the work, when he states that the opening part of the Republic does not contain any of the demonstrative arguments of which his commentary is comprised (CR 105.25\u201327, cf. 21.4). He is more immediately forthright about the reasons for what he includes in its place. In keeping with the demonstrative focus of the work, Averroes replaces Platonic dialectic with a substantial discussion of science. Having divided practical science into two parts, one about general habits and actions and another about their implementation, Averroes explains: \u201cBefore we begin a point-by-point explanation of what is in these arguments [of Plato], we ought to mention the things pertinent to this [second] part [of practical science] and explained in the first part, that serve as foundation for what we wish to say here at the beginning\u201d (CR 22.6\u20138). Averroes's introduction concerns above all the first part of political science, while the Republic proper contains only the second. Averroes attributes to Plato only a small part of the ensuing discussion, concerning justice, the division of labor, and the arrangement of the soul (CR 22.22\u201324.6, esp. 22.27, 23.31). The other passages are inspired by Aristotle and especially Alfarabi. Averroes appears to substitute scientific arguments from Aristotle and Alfarabi\u2014mainly about science, philosophy, courage, and war\u2014for Plato's dialectical introduction about justice and the founding of the just city.","btype":2,"date":"2022","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.1017\/9781800104983.002","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":28,"category_name":"al-F\u0101r\u0101b\u012b","link":"bib?categories[]=al-F\u0101r\u0101b\u012b"},{"id":30,"category_name":"Galen","link":"bib?categories[]=Galen"},{"id":21,"category_name":"Aristotle","link":"bib?categories[]=Aristotle"},{"id":20,"category_name":"Plato","link":"bib?categories[]=Plato"},{"id":4,"category_name":"Politics","link":"bib?categories[]=Politics"},{"id":23,"category_name":"Commentary","link":"bib?categories[]=Commentary"}],"authors":[{"id":1790,"full_name":" Alexander Orwin","role":1}],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":{"id":5347,"section_of":5346,"pages":"19\u201339","is_catalog":null,"book":{"id":5346,"bilderberg_idno":null,"dare_idno":null,"catalog_idno":null,"entry_type":"bibliography","type":4,"language":"en","title":"Plato's Republic in the Islamic Context. New Perspectives on Averroes's Commentary","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","short_title":"","has_no_author":null,"volume":null,"date":"2022","edition_no":null,"free_date":null,"abstract":"","republication_of":0,"online_url":"","online_resources":null,"translation_of":"0","new_edition_of":"0","is_catalog":0,"in_bibliography":0,"is_inactive":0,"notes":null,"ti_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.1017\/9781800104983","book":{"id":5346,"pubplace":"","publisher":" Boydell & Brewer","series":"","volume":"","edition_no":"","valid_from":null,"valid_until":null},"persons":[{"id":6196,"entry_id":5346,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":null,"person_id":null,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":2,"role_name":"editor"},"free_name":" Alexander Orwin","free_first_name":" Alexander","free_last_name":" Orwin","norm_person":null}]}},"article":null},"sort":["Imposing Alfarabi on Plato: Averroes\u2019s Novel Placement of the Platonic City"]}

Legitimate and Illegitimate Violence in Arabic Political Philosophy: al-Fârâbî, Ibn Rushd and Ibn Khaldûn, 2018
By: Miklós Maróth
Title Legitimate and Illegitimate Violence in Arabic Political Philosophy: al-Fârâbî, Ibn Rushd and Ibn Khaldûn
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2018
Published in Violence in Islamic Thought from the Mongols to European Imperialism
Pages 149–164
Categories al-Fārābī, Plato, Politics
Author(s) Miklós Maróth
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"5097","_score":null,"_ignored":["booksection.book.abstract.keyword"],"_source":{"id":5097,"authors_free":[{"id":5871,"entry_id":5097,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":1,"person_id":1080,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":1,"role_name":"author"},"free_name":"Mikl\u00f3s Mar\u00f3th","free_first_name":"Mikl\u00f3s","free_last_name":"Mar\u00f3th","norm_person":{"id":1080,"first_name":"Mikl\u00f3s","last_name":"Mar\u00f3th","full_name":"Mikl\u00f3s Mar\u00f3th","short_ident":"","is_classical_name":0,"dnb_url":"http:\/\/d-nb.info\/gnd\/136094120","viaf_url":"https:\/\/viaf.org\/viaf\/111274403","db_url":"","from_claudius":1,"link":"bib?authors[]=Mikl\u00f3s Mar\u00f3th"}}],"entry_title":"Legitimate and Illegitimate Violence in Arabic Political Philosophy: al-F\u00e2r\u00e2b\u00ee, Ibn Rushd and Ibn Khald\u00fbn","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"Legitimate and Illegitimate Violence in Arabic Political Philosophy: al-F\u00e2r\u00e2b\u00ee, Ibn Rushd and Ibn Khald\u00fbn"},"abstract":"","btype":2,"date":"2018","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":28,"category_name":"al-F\u0101r\u0101b\u012b","link":"bib?categories[]=al-F\u0101r\u0101b\u012b"},{"id":20,"category_name":"Plato","link":"bib?categories[]=Plato"},{"id":4,"category_name":"Politics","link":"bib?categories[]=Politics"}],"authors":[{"id":1080,"full_name":"Mikl\u00f3s Mar\u00f3th","role":1}],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":{"id":5097,"section_of":5096,"pages":"149\u2013164","is_catalog":null,"book":{"id":5096,"bilderberg_idno":null,"dare_idno":null,"catalog_idno":null,"entry_type":"bibliography","type":4,"language":"en","title":"Violence in Islamic Thought from the Mongols to European Imperialism","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","short_title":"","has_no_author":null,"volume":null,"date":"2018","edition_no":null,"free_date":null,"abstract":"Examines the development of Muslim theological, legal, literary and cultural discussions about violence and its legitimation\r\n\r\nThe violent conquest of the eastern part of the lands under Muslim rule by the Mongols marked a new period in the history of Islamic civilisation and in attitudes towards violence. This volume examines the various intellectual and cultural reactions of Muslim thinkers to these events, both within and without the territories subjected to Mongol control. Each chapter examines how violent acts were assessed by Muslim intellectuals, analysing both changes and continuity within Islamic thought over time.\r\n\r\nEach chapter is structured around a case study in which violent acts are justified or condemned, revealing the variety of attitudes to violence in the medieval period. They are framed by a detailed introduction, focusing on theoretical perspectives on violence and religion and their application, or otherwise, to medieval Islam.","republication_of":0,"online_url":"","online_resources":null,"translation_of":"0","new_edition_of":"0","is_catalog":0,"in_bibliography":0,"is_inactive":0,"notes":null,"ti_url":"","doi_url":"","book":{"id":5096,"pubplace":"Edinburgh","publisher":"Edinburgh University Press","series":"","volume":"","edition_no":"","valid_from":null,"valid_until":null}}},"article":null},"sort":["Legitimate and Illegitimate Violence in Arabic Political Philosophy: al-F\u00e2r\u00e2b\u00ee, Ibn Rushd and Ibn Khald\u00fbn"]}

Music, Poetry, and Politics in Averroes’s Commentary on Plato’s “Republic”, 2022
By: Douglas Kries
Title Music, Poetry, and Politics in Averroes’s Commentary on Plato’s “Republic”
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2022
Published in Plato's Republic in the Islamic Context. New Perspectives on Averroes's Commentary
Pages 87–110
Categories Poetics, Politics, Plato
Author(s) Douglas Kries
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
As our title announces, the current essay will explore three subjects that, in Averroes's Commentary on Plato's “Republic,” lead from one into another, almost like a short series of stepping-stones. The first part of the essay will consider the treatment of music in the Commentary, arguing that Averroes effectively reduces music to poetry. The second of the stepping-stones will show that the Commentary credits poetry with educating the young especially and in that way transforms poetry into a political art for disciplining and educating citizens. The third will take up the question of the Andalusian's extended criticism of poetry's common practice of offering pleasurable prizes and rewards for virtue and show how the Commentator applies this criticism of poetry to the very author on whom he is commenting. In pursuing all three of these questions, we will focus squarely on Averroes's Commentary on Plato's “Republic,” attempting to understand that text on its own terms but against its obvious background, the Republic of Plato. Nevertheless, in pursuing the teaching of The Commentary on Plato's “Republic,” we cannot neglect the important research that has been done in recent decades on classical Islamic philosophy's understanding of Aristotle's Organon generally and of the Poetics in particular. We will therefore turn to the reports of other scholars on these aspects of Averroes, at least to the extent that such reports will be helpful in enabling us to understand better the Commentary on Plato's “Republic.” In the Republic, Plato initiates his analysis of the education of the guardians with a discussion of music in the latter portions of book 2; that discussion extends through much of book 3. Averroes's corresponding treatment of the education of the guardians through music is in the “First Treatise” of the Commentary, mostly in a relatively lengthy and isolable section that extends from 29.9 through 36.5. During his treatment of music, Plato divides his subject into three parts: “melody is composed of three things—speech, harmonic mode, and rhythm.” Averroes seems to accept this division, although he inverts the order of the three elements: “A melody occurring in a narrative is composed of three things: rhythm, harmonic mode, and the speech to which the melody is set” (34.30–31).

{"_index":"bib","_type":"_doc","_id":"5350","_score":null,"_source":{"id":5350,"authors_free":[{"id":6200,"entry_id":5350,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":null,"person_id":null,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":1,"role_name":"author"},"free_name":"Douglas Kries","free_first_name":"Douglas","free_last_name":"Kries","norm_person":null}],"entry_title":"Music, Poetry, and Politics in Averroes\u2019s Commentary on Plato\u2019s \u201cRepublic\u201d","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","main_title":{"title":"Music, Poetry, and Politics in Averroes\u2019s Commentary on Plato\u2019s \u201cRepublic\u201d"},"abstract":"As our title announces, the current essay will explore three subjects that, in Averroes's Commentary on Plato's \u201cRepublic,\u201d lead from one into another, almost like a short series of stepping-stones. The first part of the essay will consider the treatment of music in the Commentary, arguing that Averroes effectively reduces music to poetry. The second of the stepping-stones will show that the Commentary credits poetry with educating the young especially and in that way transforms poetry into a political art for disciplining and educating citizens. The third will take up the question of the Andalusian's extended criticism of poetry's common practice of offering pleasurable prizes and rewards for virtue and show how the Commentator applies this criticism of poetry to the very author on whom he is commenting. In pursuing all three of these questions, we will focus squarely on Averroes's Commentary on Plato's \u201cRepublic,\u201d attempting to understand that text on its own terms but against its obvious background, the Republic of Plato. Nevertheless, in pursuing the teaching of The Commentary on Plato's \u201cRepublic,\u201d we cannot neglect the important research that has been done in recent decades on classical Islamic philosophy's understanding of Aristotle's Organon generally and of the Poetics in particular. We will therefore turn to the reports of other scholars on these aspects of Averroes, at least to the extent that such reports will be helpful in enabling us to understand better the Commentary on Plato's \u201cRepublic.\u201d\r\n\r\nIn the Republic, Plato initiates his analysis of the education of the guardians with a discussion of music in the latter portions of book 2; that discussion extends through much of book 3. Averroes's corresponding treatment of the education of the guardians through music is in the \u201cFirst Treatise\u201d of the Commentary, mostly in a relatively lengthy and isolable section that extends from 29.9 through 36.5. During his treatment of music, Plato divides his subject into three parts: \u201cmelody is composed of three things\u2014speech, harmonic mode, and rhythm.\u201d Averroes seems to accept this division, although he inverts the order of the three elements: \u201cA melody occurring in a narrative is composed of three things: rhythm, harmonic mode, and the speech to which the melody is set\u201d (34.30\u201331).","btype":2,"date":"2022","language":"English","online_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.1017\/9781800104983.005","ti_url":"","categories":[{"id":44,"category_name":"Poetics","link":"bib?categories[]=Poetics"},{"id":4,"category_name":"Politics","link":"bib?categories[]=Politics"},{"id":20,"category_name":"Plato","link":"bib?categories[]=Plato"}],"authors":[],"works":[],"republication_of":null,"translation_of":null,"new_edition_of":null,"book":null,"booksection":{"id":5350,"section_of":5346,"pages":"87\u2013110","is_catalog":null,"book":{"id":5346,"bilderberg_idno":null,"dare_idno":null,"catalog_idno":null,"entry_type":"bibliography","type":4,"language":"en","title":"Plato's Republic in the Islamic Context. New Perspectives on Averroes's Commentary","title_transcript":"","title_translation":"","short_title":"","has_no_author":null,"volume":null,"date":"2022","edition_no":null,"free_date":null,"abstract":"","republication_of":0,"online_url":"","online_resources":null,"translation_of":"0","new_edition_of":"0","is_catalog":0,"in_bibliography":0,"is_inactive":0,"notes":null,"ti_url":"","doi_url":"https:\/\/doi.org\/10.1017\/9781800104983","book":{"id":5346,"pubplace":"","publisher":" Boydell & Brewer","series":"","volume":"","edition_no":"","valid_from":null,"valid_until":null},"persons":[{"id":6196,"entry_id":5346,"agent_type":"person","is_normalised":null,"person_id":null,"institution_id":null,"role":{"id":2,"role_name":"editor"},"free_name":" Alexander Orwin","free_first_name":" Alexander","free_last_name":" Orwin","norm_person":null}]}},"article":null},"sort":["Music, Poetry, and Politics in Averroes\u2019s Commentary on Plato\u2019s \u201cRepublic\u201d"]}

The Cambridge Platonists and Averroes, 2013
By: Sarah Hutton
Title The Cambridge Platonists and Averroes
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2013
Published in Renaissance Averroism and Its Aftermath: Arabic Philosophy in Early Modern Europe
Pages 197–212
Categories Plato, Averroism, Tradition and Reception
Author(s) Sarah Hutton
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)
The ‘Averroism’ which figures in my chapter is a radically attenuated version of the philosophy of Ibn Rushd – Averroism as represented by a single doctrine imputed to the Commentator, namely the idea of a single soul, common to all human beings. The subject of my chapter has less, therefore to do with the thought of Averroes in its later reception or manifestation, and more to do with an idea of Averroism which was current in seventeenth-century England. This is particularly true of the Cambridge Platonists for whom the Averroist doctrine of the intellectus agens is the key doctrine which they associate with Averroes and which they understood as a doctrine of a ‘single soul’ or ‘common soul’. The only one of their number to offer anything like an extensive critique of Averroes was Henry More (1614–1687). Although he too was primarily concerned with the Averroistic conception of the intellectus agens, his response is distinctive for his concern with the Italian Averroists of recent times, Girolamo Cardano, Pietro Pomponazzi and Giulio Cesare Vanini. Even though the Cambridge Platonists’ views on the intellectus agens tell us more about themselves than about Averroes, their limited focus is nevertheless revealing of currents of diffusion of Averroistic ideas, and of the presence of Averroes even in the new waters of early modern philosophy. As I shall argue later, there is an important sense in which More’s partial and distorted conception of the philosophy of Ibn Rushd contributed to a new conception of the self centred on consciousness. My chapter will offer a brief survey of identifiable references to Averroes in the work the Cambridge Platonists, starting with three Emmanuel College men, John Smith (1618–1652), Nathaniel Culverwell (1619–1651) and Ralph Cudworth (1617–1688). I shall then discuss Henry More, to whom the major part of this chapter will be devoted. But before discussing the Cambridge school, a few words on the background.

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The ruler’s essential qualities in Averroes’ Commentary on Plato’s „Republic“, 2013
By: Rosalie Helena de Souza Pereira
Title The ruler’s essential qualities in Averroes’ Commentary on Plato’s „Republic“
Type Book Section
Language English
Date 2013
Published in Dialogues on Plato's Politeia (Republic): selected papers from the Ninth Symposium Platonicum
Pages 371–376
Categories Politics, Plato, Commentary
Author(s) Rosalie Helena de Souza Pereira
Publisher(s)
Translator(s)

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